Packets of silken tofu ready to be used in a vegan recipe

How to cook with silken tofu

I love silken tofu. It is a really versatile ingredient that can truly be the star of the show when used in the right recipe. Check out my favourite ways of cooking with silken tofu here.

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Contents

Would this even be a vegan food blog if I didn’t talk about silken tofu at least once or twice…?

Probably not.

But that is no surprise, tofu is incredible. Most people’s complaints about tofu are my reasons for loving it. Yes it is plain, but that means you can add your favourite flavourings to it. It is incredibly diverse and I am always discovering new ways to cook with it.

Firm tofu gets all the fun press, so we want to turn our sights to the mighty silken tofu. You’ll find it hidden away on a shelf somewhere in the supermarket (normally in the free-from or the world food aisles). 

Because they are long-life you can stock up on loads of packets and work your way through all these fun and inventive ways of cooking silken tofu.

Do you have your own favourite silken tofu recipe that you’d like to share with me, or have you tried one of the ideas below? Well I want to hear about it! Drop it in the comments at the bottom of this post.

What is the best silken tofu to buy?

There are quite a few silken tofu products available to buy and the best one to buy will always be the most fresh, if possible. So if you have a local Asian supermarket nearby, make sure to check out the fridge section to see if they have any fresh silken tofu on offer.

If not, then my favourite silken tofu to buy is by Clearspring. It has a great consistency and works really well in all of the following silken tofu cooking ideas.

Here are the 8 inventive ways to cook with silken tofu

Have a browse of my favourite recipe ideas using silken tofu. All vegan and tasty!

Creamy vegan pasta made using silken tofu

1. Blend it into a creamy pasta sauce

This is probably one of my favourite recipes that I make. It is incredibly easy to rustle up in an evening and it tastes amazingly creamy.

Simply blend up a packet of silken tofu (including the water) with your choice of herbs, spices, and plenty of seasoning. I like adding a pinch of nutmeg, or some lemon zest.

Mix the blended silken tofu into your pasta base (e.g. onions, garlic, vegan chicken), heat through before stirring in the pasta, and then serve.

You could also use this mix as you would a béchamel in a lasagna, or as a creamy topping for your vegan enchiladas.

A slice of baked vegan cheesecake

2. Bake it into a vegan cheesecake

Want to know how I get a perfectly baked vegan cheesecake? I use silken tofu. And it works a treat!

Silken tofu has magic egg like abilities that allows you to make baked set foods like a cheesecake. When you blend the silken tofu it turns into a liquid, which makes it really easy to add other flavours. And then when you bake it for some time it begins to set again.

In order to make this baked vegan cheesecake, simply blend the silken tofu in with vegan cream cheese and flavourings, pour it onto your cheesecake base and bake.

vegan quiche recipe using silken tofu

3. Blend it into a vegan quiche

This was probably one of my best discoveries to date, silken tofu makes the most amazing vegan quiches.

You blend up the silken tofu with your choice of seasoning and flavourings, I pack mine full of nutritional yeast, a little bit of black salt (to imitate egg flavours), and turmeric.

Stir in a mix of veg, vegan meats (like This isn’t bacon), and top with some pretty foods like halved cherry tomatoes. Pour onto your quiche base and bake in the oven for at least 1 hour. Take it out, leave it to cool completely, and then cut yourself a generous slice.

Just like the baked vegan cheesecake, the blended silken tofu mix binds back together once cooked in the oven to make this eggless quiche.

silken tofu eaten as it is 1 scaled 1

4. Serve it as it is (Hiyayakko)

We couldn’t talk about silken tofu without mentioning one of the most traditional ways of eating it, simply as it comes.

This is a very popular Japanese dish called Hiyayakko and it essentially consists of a cold block of fresh silken tofu topped with soy sauce, onions, ginger and sesame seeds. It is often served with bonito flakes, which aren’t careful, so be careful of this if you are ordering this dish out in a Japanese restaurant!

The reason this dish is so incredible is because the silken tofu will be served fresh. But you can recreate it easily with the packaged stuff. Just make sure to buy that ticket to Japan so you can also try the real thing.

I first tried this dish at Fujifuku (浅草 小料理バル 藤福) in Tokyo where it was topped with soy sauce and crispy seaweed – yum.

silken tofu used as scrambled tofu scaled 1

5. Scramble it

Okay this vegan dish has been popular for quite some time now, but it is still a pretty inventive way of using silken tofu and is a firm favourite of mine to make.

I like to drain the silken tofu, fry off some onion and garlic, and then drop the whole block of tofu into the pan. I’ll gently break up the tofu using my spatula, keeping it quite chunky. Make sure to add plenty of seasoning and spices!

Top tip: if you like some texture in your scrambled tofu my vegan mum likes to mix in some chopped up firm tofu alongside the silken tofu.

silken tofu used as vegan feta cheese scaled 1

6. Make it into vegan feta cheese

Looking for a soft squidgy feta cheese alternative to stick into your favourite salads or to simply munch on throughout the day? Then you’ll love this vegan silken tofu feta hack.

Chop up the silken tofu very carefully into square chunks and add into a jar with apple cider vinegar, oil, fresh herbs, salt, lemon juice, and any of your favourite flavours. Get inventive!

Let the tofu absorb all the flavours for at least a few hours, but the longer the better!

silken tofu fried scaled 1

7. Deep fry it (agedashi)

Deep fat frying is normally left to the firmer tofu blocks but I believe that if done right, silken tofu that has been deep fat fried is MUCH better. And the Japanese would definitely agree, since they use deep fried silken tofu in their Agedashi tofu recipe.

Drain the tofu and pat it down on a kitchen towel. You’ll then want to be extra careful when slicing the tofu into chunks, making sure it doesn’t break apart. 

Lightly coat the tofu in flour, or use your favourite batter mix, and then plop them into the fryer (or lots of oil in a pan).

They’ll puff up and go nice and golden brown. Serve with a spicy mayo for extra perfection.

Korean soup with silken tofu

8. Cook it into a stew (sundubu jjigae)

I love a good soup. Whether it’s thick and creamy, like a Laksa, or thin and bold, like a Phở (pronounced ‘fuh-h’ for any of those wondering.

Adding cubed silken tofu into any Asian-esque soup is a must. You can either drop it into the soup a few minutes before serving so that it soaks up all the flavour, or you can add it straight into your serving bowl and pour the soup ontop.

One of my favourite variations of this soup comes from Korea, in the form of sundubu jjigae, a soft tofu stew. It is flavoured with kimchi, so it packs a punch!

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